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Protein phosphatase 2B dual function facilitates synaptic integrity and motor learning

Research group De Zeeuw
Publication year 2021
Published in The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience
Authors C.I. De Zeeuw, Zhanmin Lin, Bin Wu, Maarten W Paul, Ka Wan Li, Yao Yao, Ihor Smal, Martina Proietti Onori, Hana Hasanbegovic, Karel Bezstarosti, Jeroen A A Demmers, Adriaan B Houtsmuller, Erik Meijering, Freek E Hoebeek, Martijn Schonewille, August B Smit, Zhenyu Gao,

Protein phosphatase 2B (PP2B) is critical for synaptic plasticity and learning, but the molecular mechanisms involved remain unclear. Here we identified different types of proteins that interact with PP2B, among which structural proteins of the postsynaptic densities (PSDs) of Purkinje cells (PCs) in mice of either se. Deleting PP2B reduced expression of PSD proteins and the relative thickness of PSD at parallel fiber to PC synapses, whereas re-expression of inactive PP2B partly restored the impaired distribution of nanoclusters of PSD proteins, together indicating a structural role of PP2B. In contrast, lateral mobility of surface glutamate receptors solely depended on PP2B phosphatase activity. Finally, the level of motor learning co-varied with both the enzymatic and non-enzymatic function of PP2B. Thus, PP2B controls synaptic function and learning both through its action as a phosphatase and as a structural protein facilitating synapse integrity.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENTPhosphatases are generally considered to serve their critical role in learning and memory through their enzymatic operations. Here, we show that Protein Phosphatase 2B (PP2B) interacts with structural proteins at the synapses of cerebellar Purkinje cells. Differentially manipulating the enzymatic and structural domains of PP2B leads to different phenotypes in cerebellar learning. We propose that PP2B is crucial for cerebellar learning via two complementary actions, an enzymatic and a structural operation.

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