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Possible Obesogenic Effects of Bisphenols Accumulation in the Human Brain

Research group Swaab
Publication year 2018
Published in Scientific Reports
Authors D.F. Swaab, Pantelis Charisiadis, Xanthi D Andrianou, Thomas P van der Meer, Wilfred F A den Dunnen, Bruce H R Wolffenbuttel, Konstantinos C Makris, Jana V van Vliet-Ostaptchouk,
The order of authors may deviate from the original publication due to temporary technical issues.

Evidence of bisphenols’ obesogenic effects on humans is mixed and inconsistent. We aimed to explore the presence of bisphenol A (BPA), bisphenol F (BPF) and chlorinated BPA (ClBPA), collectively called the bisphenols, in different brain regions and their association with obesity using post-mortem hypothalamic and white matter brain material from twelve pairs of obese (body mass index (BMI) >30 kg/m2) and normal-weight individuals (BMI <25 kg/m2). Mean ratios of hypothalamus:white matter for BPA, BPF and ClBPA were 1.5, 0.92, 0.95, respectively, suggesting no preferential accumulation of the bisphenols in the grey matter (hypothalamic) or white matter-enriched brain areas. We observed differences in hypothalamic concentrations among the bisphenols, with highest median level detected for ClBPA (median: 2.4 ng/g), followed by BPF (2.2 ng/g) and BPA (1.2 ng/g); similar ranking was observed for the white matter samples (median for: ClBPA-2.5 ng/g, BPF-2.3 ng/g, and BPA-1.0 ng/g). Furthermore, all bisphenol concentrations, except for white-matter BPF were associated with obesity (p < 0.05). This is the first study reporting the presence of bisphenols in two distinct regions of the human brain. Bisphenols accumulation in the white matter-enriched brain tissue could signify that they are able to cross the blood-brain barrier.

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